Alphabets, Pigs, and Irish Rabbits

This week we’re looking at a technical workbook from Princeton Architectural Press, persistent piglets who won’t go to sleep, and an Irish translation of a classic children’s book. 

“Draw Your Own Alphabets: Thirty Fonts to Scribble, Sketch, & Make your Own,” by Tony Seddon; Princeton Architectural Press, $19.95, 160 pages, ages 12-up.

(Available April 9, 2013)

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Draw Your Own Alphabets: Thirty Fonts to Scribble, Sketch, & Make your Own Reproduced by permission of the publisher, Princeton Architectural Press, NY.

This book takes the art of custom-drawn fonts, – lively, hand-drawn letters often perfected by middle school adepts – to an extraordinary level of sophistication. British graphic designer Tony Seddon opens the manual with a primer on the history of hand-lettering, including tips for perfecting one’s craft, the pros and cons of tracing, and understanding the basic structure of letterforms. Seddon teaches the proper techniques to create funky, personalized fonts in this very hands-on workbook.

The thirty alphabet fonts all are custom drawn by a team of young designers and illustrators who each reveal a little about themselves and the inspiration for their fonts. For example, artist Michelle Tilly discovered the origins for her “Spotty Fairground” font by observing antique signs on a Bristol pier.

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Draw Your Own Alphabets: Thirty Fonts to Scribble, Sketch, & Make your Own  Reproduced by permission of the publisher, Princeton Architectural Press, NY. 

There is a style here to suit any mood and personality, ranging from the Pacman-inspired “Butterman,” to “Topiary” where the letters resemble leafy bushes. My favorite font is the “Octobet.” This intricately detailed font is influenced by the Norse legend of the fearsome sea-monster, the Kraken.  

Seddon concludes with a useful section on how to use one’s fonts by digitizing them.  A glossary of terms as well as an anatomy of principal font features rounds out the book. This isn’t necessarily a book geared towards children, but placed in the right hands it would no doubt be lovingly received and perhaps nurture grains of artistic creativity.  A perceptive child might also enjoy reading the included designers’ biographies.

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Draw Your Own Alphabets: Thirty Fonts to Scribble, Sketch, & Make your Own  Reproduced by permission of the publisher, Princeton Architectural Press, NY. 


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Piggies in Pajamas, Reproducedby permission of the publisher, Simon & Schuster, NY.

“Piggies in Pajamas,” by Michelle Meadows, illustrated by Ard Hoyt; Simon & Schuster, $15.99, 32 pages, ages 3-5.

Michelle Meadows has brought back her adorably boisterous pig family, this time for a nocturnal escapade. In 2011’s Piggies in the Kitchen, the piglets took over the kitchen and surprised Mama with a birthday cake. In this latest installment, bedtime takes a back seat to navigating an ocean adventure, riding a train, and playing dress-up.  Each imaginative pursuit is a precarious one – they are supposed to be counting sheep, after all – and when they suspect Mama’s heading up the stairs, they dash to bed to avoid detection.  As with the Kitchen book, Meadows employs the same lively, catchy quatrain a-b-a-b pattern that younger readers will adore repeating.  “Piggies in pajamas/Scoot across the floor,/ Going for a train ride,/speeding past the door.” Ard Hoyt renders the plucky piglets in light watercolors that fully capture the spirit and excitement of the tale.  The high-octane energy level in this book may make it a difficult bedtime choice, but will be thoroughly enjoyed no matter when it’s read.  

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Piggies in Pajamas, Reproducedby permission of the publisher, Simon & Schuster, NY.



“Tomhais Méid Mo Ghrá Duit” (Guess How Much I Love You in Irish), by Sam McBratney, illustrated by Anita Jeram; Candlewick Press, $9.99, 32 pages, ages 3-7.

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While the classic tale of Little Nutbrown Hare and Big Nutbrown Hare is close to two decades old, this brand-new edition is just in time for St. Patrick’s Day celebrations.  Both author Sam McBratney and illustrator Anita Jeram call Ireland home and pay tribute to their land and language with this Gaelic translation of their beloved story.  There’s no Irish-English glossary, nor is there a pronunciation guide, so intrepid readers may want to have the English version on hand, or visit one of the many Gaelic pronunciation guides available online.  (I found standingstones.com/gaelpron.html to be quite informative and straightforward.) 

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