Heribert Tenschert and TEFAF Fall Illuminate New York Next Week – The Fine Books Blog

Readers may recall our story back in March highlighing the TEFAF Maastricht art and antiquarian fair. Next week TEFAF lands in Manhattan, where it will hold court at the Park Avenue Armory from October 28 through November 1 and welcome nearly one hundred dealers from around the world. Held three times a year in North America and in Europe, TEFAF is widely considered one of the world’s premier art and antiques fair, offering museum-quality pieces to the general public.

Among the dealers at this year’s show include Heribert Tenschert, a Switzerland-based German bookseller who, in his words, specializes in “the finest manuscripts and printed books available in the book market.” Read all about Tenschert and his magnificent books at: Heribert Tenschert and TEFAF Fall Illuminate New York Next Week – The Fine Books Blog

Spirits at Stowe House

If you’re looking for a literary take on Halloween, check out the Harriet Beecher Stowe Center in Hartford this month, which will be hosting an after-hours ghost tour while discussing 19th-century Spiritualism. Read more at the Fine Books Blog. 

First Solo U.S. Show for Book Artist Mark Cockram Opens Today

The Center for Book Arts (CBA) opens its latest exhibit this evening dedicated to the work of British artist and CBA faculty fellow Mark Cockram. “Beyond the Rules” includes examples of Cockram’s creative bookbinding and book artistry. Plus, Nick Basbanes speaks on Saturday in Cambridge, Massachusetts, about Henry and Fanny Longfellow. Get all the details on the Fine Books Blog.

 

 

Sylvia Plath Symposium at Grolier Club – The Fine Books Blog

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On October 12 the Grolier Club in Manhattan will host a symposium dedicated to Sylvia Plath. Read about the symposium on the Fine Books Blog

Dispatch from Paris: Endangered Bouquinistes Need Your Help

Paris remains a beacon of culture and sophistication and a week spent promenading along the city’s quais and quaint streets was balm for the soul. Among the many familiar sights were the bouquinistes, those riverside booksellers whose forest green stalls have been a fixture by the Seine since at least the 18th century. The tradition of traveling bookselling in Paris goes back even further; known as “libraries forain,” wandering booksellers plied their trade as early as the 1550s when they were accused of distributing Protestant propaganda during the Wars of Religion. Open-air bookstalls were banned in 1649, and meandering booksellers were chased out of the city by Louis V during the 1720s. The ill-fated Louis XVI tolerated their return in the 1750s, and by the time Napoleon I took power, the bouquinistes had reestablished their territory along the riverbank, where they’ve remained a fixture ever since.

Yet, the bouquinistes as we know them are in danger of turning into little more than trinket shops with matching roofs. Read all about it on the Fine Books Blog.

Paperbacks from Hell

New from Quirk Books is an account of the world of horror pulp fiction of the 1970s and ’80s. Author and horror historian Grady Hendrix (HorrorstörMy Best Friend’s Exorcism) traces the unexpected success of Ira Levin’s Rosemary’s Baby, Thomas Tryon’s The Other, and William Blatty’s The Exorcist–three nightmare novels that became bestsellers and spawned two decades of provocative horror publishing. Read more, if you dare, at the Fine Books Blog.

Majestic Ocean Liners the Subject of PEM Exhibit

For roughly one hundred years, from the mid-1800s through the 1950s, luxurious ocean liners lured travelers to exotic locales, themselves floating masterpieces of sophistication and the latest technological innovations. Now through October 9, the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Massachusetts is hosting an exhibition exploring the beautiful nautical heritage of these grande dames: Ocean Liners: Glamour, Speed, and Style, co-organized with London’s Victoria and Albert Museum. Read more at the Fine Books Blog.