She Persisted

She Persisted: 13 American Women Who Changed the World, by Chelsea Clinton, illustrated by Alexandra Boiger, Philomel; $17.99 32 pages, ages 4-7.

“I wrote this book for everyone who’s ever wanted to speak up but has been told to quiet down–for everyone who’s ever been made to feel less than,” said Chelsea Clinton about her children’s book, She Persisted. Certainly, the goal is laudable: profile thirteen American women whose strength and perserverance helped change the world for the better. Harriet Tubman, Hellen Keller, Virginia Apgar, and even Oprah Winfrey appear as pint-size activists. In each vignette, Clinton presents the challenges each woman faced and repeats the current feminist rallying-call, “She persisted.” The book joins a fleet of recently published girl-power volumes like Feminist Baby and Goodnight Stories for Rebel Girls

Each woman is presented chronologically, but there are no dates to pinpoint the progression across time. Luckily, Alexandra Boiger’s marvelous double-page illustrations help to fill the gap. Perceptive readers will have questions about these women, such as when they lived, how they made history, and who helped them. For example, Anne Sullivan appears in an image of Hellen Keller, but isn’t mentioned by name. Yet, there are no endnotes or bibliography to help answer those questions. That aside, the text itself feels forced–read aloud, the words are halting, hesitating, and, unfortunately, boring, which these women certainly were not. The presentation is less a celebration than a suggestion that women, simply by virtue of being women, will always face a stacked deck, and those who succeed do so alone.

Clinton fans will no doubt flock to the book regardless, but those looking for more engaging accounts of brave American women would do better to look elsewhere–the recently published Motor Girls by Sue Macy, for example (National Geographic, $17.99, ages 11-14), is a fascinating account of women at the turn of the twentieth century who took to the open road despite much (male) protest. It’s thorough, engaging, and packed with primary source material, statistics, and lively anecdotes. Amy Ehrlich’s Willa, illustrated by Wendell Minor (Paula Wiseman, $16.99, 72 pages, ages 6-10) is an excellent picture-book biography of one of America’s most beloved writers.

Well-intentioned, She Persisted lacks joy, and despite its simplicity, manages to strike an unwelcome didactic tone. “Remember these women,” Clinton writes. “They persisted and so should you.” Rather than a lively, well-written, and informational account of great women, She Persisted offers platitudes that do little to inspire.

 

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literarykids:

Daylight Starlight Wildlife, by Wendell Minor; Nancy Paulsen Books, $17.99, ages 3-6.

Summer is the perfect time to get children acquainted with nature, so be sure to bring this book along on your journeys. Wendell Minor has spent a lifetime painting the great outdoors, and his art has graced the covers of work by Jean Craighead George, Jack London, Alice Shertle, and David McCullough. Here, his vibrant gouache and watercolor portraits of various common critters introduce young readers to the variety of fauna that surround us. In addition to learning about animal behavior, adults may pick up a new word too – crepuscular, which refers to those animals most active at twilight. (Bats, frogs, rabbits and snails are a few.) A handy resource guide makes this a perfect accompaniment for outdoor adventures.

@VikingChildrens

@nancyrosep For #TBThursday, I offer this charming nature exploration by Wendell Minor.

@thebrucemuseum Wild Reading: Animals in Children’s Book Art

From the Big Bad Wolf to the Frog Prince and Peter Rabbit, animals have long played central roles in children’s literature. Now the Bruce Museum in Greenwich, Connecticut is exploring how and why artists highlight certain animal characteristics. Wild Reading: Animals in Children’s Book Art, which opened March 26, includes over thirty illustrations and original artwork by Lynne Cherry, Wendell Minor, Wendy Rasmussen, Maurice Sendak, Eric Carle, Fred Marcellino, and Brendan Wenzel. Taxidermy specimens from the Bruce’s natural history collection are paired with illustrated counterparts to demonstrate what makes each animal unique, and why artists choose to focus on one feature or another. A surprisingly alert raccoon, for example, is mounted next to a watercolor illustration by Brendan Wenzel, which emphasizes the creature’s large, inquisitive, eyes. A gray wolf, groundhog, chipmunks, three black bears, and other stuffed creatures offer plenty of opportunities to explore a range of artistic styles–Wendell Minor’s keen observation of animals in natural habitats contrasts nicely with Scott Nash’s swashbuckling, whimsical pirate, Captain Blue Jay. No matter the method, each illustrator engages children in the story at hand. The whole ensemble delightfully combines art and science.

Wild Reading: Animals in Children’s Book Art runs from March 26 through July 3, 2016 at the Bruce Museum in Greenwich, CT. Visit the museum website for hours of operation and special activity days.

Daylight Starlight Wildlife, by Wendell Minor; Nancy Paulsen Books, $17.99, ages 3-6.

Summer is the perfect time to get children acquainted with nature, so be sure to bring this book along on your journeys. Wendell Minor has spent a lifetime painting the great outdoors, and his art has graced the covers of work by Jean Craighead George, Jack London, Alice Shertle, and David McCullough. Here, his vibrant gouache and watercolor portraits of various common critters introduce young readers to the variety of fauna that surround us. In addition to learning about animal behavior, adults may pick up a new word too – crepuscular, which refers to those animals most active at twilight. (Bats, frogs, rabbits and snails are a few.) A handy resource guide makes this a perfect accompaniment for outdoor adventures.