Dispatch from Paris: Endangered Bouquinistes Need Your Help

Paris remains a beacon of culture and sophistication and a week spent promenading along the city’s quais and quaint streets was balm for the soul. Among the many familiar sights were the bouquinistes, those riverside booksellers whose forest green stalls have been a fixture by the Seine since at least the 18th century. The tradition of traveling bookselling in Paris goes back even further; known as “libraries forain,” wandering booksellers plied their trade as early as the 1550s when they were accused of distributing Protestant propaganda during the Wars of Religion. Open-air bookstalls were banned in 1649, and meandering booksellers were chased out of the city by Louis V during the 1720s. The ill-fated Louis XVI tolerated their return in the 1750s, and by the time Napoleon I took power, the bouquinistes had reestablished their territory along the riverbank, where they’ve remained a fixture ever since.

Yet, the bouquinistes as we know them are in danger of turning into little more than trinket shops with matching roofs. Read all about it on the Fine Books Blog.

New Graphic Novel Biography Shines Spotlight on Josephine Baker

On June 3rd, Josephine Baker would have been 111 years old. A recently published graphic novel explores her life and rise to fame. Check it out on the Fine Books Blog. 

Denshosha–Memory Keeper Chiharu Shiota Disembarks in Paris

03_SHIOTA-Savannah_museum.jpg
Shiota exhibit at Savannah Museum of Art. Reproduced courtesy of Galerie Templon.

Japanese artist Chiharu Shiota stages a new exhibition at Galerie Templon in Paris. Read all about it on the Fine Books Blog

A Book-Lover’s Guide to St. Patrick’s Day – The Fine Books Blog

Today is St. Patrick’s Day, meaning Irish pubs from Boston to Dublin will be busier than usual and just about everyone will be sporting some sort of good luck charm. However, if the idea of day-drinking and parade-hopping turns you green, there’s still a few ways to let your inner Irish spirit free, even from the comfort of your own library. Check out the bibliophile’s guide to St. Patrick’s Day – The Fine Books Blog

Catalog Review-Catalogue Huit

(via Catalogue Review: “Catalogue Huit” by Jean-Baptiste de Proyart – The Fine Books Blog)

Instagram Artists Remake Iconic Artwork to Promote Paris Museums – The Fine Books Blog

@miss_etc

@rafaelmantesso  @audrey.pirault 
@Paris @instagram 
@parismusees

image

Instagram Artists Remake Iconic Artwork to Promote Paris Museums – The Fine Books Blog

@lonelyplanet

We’ll Always Have Pop-Ups

Pop-Up Paris, by Andy Mansfield; Lonely Planet Kids, $9.99, 8 pages, ages 3-6.

When readers can’t travel, well-crafted pop-ups offer wonderful opportunities to learn about the world around them. Lonely Planet Kids, an imprint of parent company Lonely Planet, recently launched three children’s pop-up books to coincide with its line of family-friendly tour guides and on-the-go activity books.

The first in the series, Pop-Up Paris, is a charming introduction to six must-see, kid-friendly sites in the City of Light, from the Pompidou Center to a tower of sugary macarons. Short on textual detail, the book is clearly geared towards a pre-k through first grade readership, providing a snippet of information to inspire children to learn more about the topic at hand. Hyper-pigmented illustrations, bordering on neon, are hip without pretense. In short, this is a book that knows it’s fun.

Easy to tote, easy to read, the Lonely Planet Kids Pop-Ups series has found a way to hook young explorers on the richness of traveling, even from the comfort of home.

Check out a 30-second video highlighting all three titles here.