Folio Society Announces Retail Presence in NYC

MANHATTAN – On Tuesday June 5th, representatives from the Folio Society marked its entrée into select New York City bookstores with champagne toasts and hands-on time with some of the publishing house’s finest wares. Chartwell Booksellers hosted the event. The celebration marks the first time in Folio Society’s sixty-seven year history that its titles are available in bookstores. 

The fine books publisher began developing a partnership with retailers in 2001, when the company extended its catalog to London-based Harrods’s, Waterstones, the British Library and the British Museum. Tuesday’s affair recognized the Folio Society’s US launch.

Folio Society’s move into bookstores means customers do not have to first become Society members, and they will be able to physically handle the books, two salient points the company considered before pursuing its push into retail outlets. “The best way to appreciate our craftsmanship and the quality of our editions is to experience them first hand,” says Folio Society’s managing director Toby Hartwell.

In addition to Chartwell Booksellers, New Yorkers can find Folio Society editions at the Community Bookstore in Brooklyn, children’s books at Books of Wonder and at Writers Shop at the NYPL. The Frick Collection will be offering art books for sale as well. 

 The Folio Society plans to expand its retail presence into Boston later in 2014. 

literarykids:

Image reproduced with permission from Sterling Publishers.  ©2014 Linda Beck.

“Goodnight Songs,” by Margaret Wise Brown, illustrated by various illustrators, Sterling Children’s books, $17.95, 28 pages, ages 2-5.

For over sixty years, children have drifted to dreamland after reading the quintessential bedtime story Goodnight Moon. Now comes a previously unpublished collection of Margaret Wise Brown’s charming lullabies for a new generation of readers.

Amy Gary, the editor of Brown’s Estate, introduces the collection by describing her discovery of a treasure trove of manuscripts. Tucked away for decades in a trunk in an attic barn on the author’s family farm in Vermont, all but three have never been printed until now.

Also among the hidden treasures were musical scores Brown was composing for a children’s record company. An accompanying disk includes songs based on the poems. Emily Gary and Tom Proutt set the poems to music, and managed to capture the effortless imagery of Brown’s work. 

A different contributor illustrated each poem and the list reads like a who’s-who of award winning artists. Caldecott Honor medalist Melissa Sweet, Coretta Scott King Honor Award winner Sean Qualls, and New York Times Best Illustrated Book winner Carin Berger were among the dozen asked to collaborate on the project.  Brown’s innate understanding of what entertains and comforts children will delight everyone who comes across this gem, now and for years to come.    

literarykids:

 Shackleton: Antarctic Odyssey, by Nick Bertozzi; First Second Books, $16.99, 128 pages, ages 12-18. (Publication date: June 17, 2014)

Amateur and professional explorers worldwide will mark the centennial of Ernest Shackelton’s ill-fated yet miraculous voyage to the Antarctic this year. Entire documentaries and symposiums are devoted to understanding how the entire crew survived in polar conditions after their ship became trapped and ultimately crushed in pack ice. There’s even a cruise called the Shackelton 100 that will recreate the route of the Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition. 

For adventurers staying close to home, Nick Bertozzi’s graphic novel replicates the voyage through a riveting and wholly original approach to telling this story of survival. Historians have meticulously documented the expedition, but in this account Bertozzi changes the point of view by inviting the reader onto the Endurance alongside the captain and his crew.  Each panel illustrates the minutiae of life aboard a sea vessel – from chronicling Mr. Orde-Lee riding a bicycle across the ice, to a chapter called “Last Dog” which delicately handles the issue of starvation and self-preservation. 

Bertozzi’s black and white illustrations overflow with visual detail while creating a solid and engaging story.  Ships, men and various polar creatures are at once grand and familiar. While the author is quite deft depicting each man in the story, Shackelton stands out from his crew; a tall, dark-haired commander determined to bring  all twenty-eight crewmen home after almost two years lost at sea.

Writing and illustrating stories of great explorers seems second-nature to Bertozzi, whose previous work includes Lewis and Clark, an equally inventive examination of two great explorers. Could Amelia Earhart or Thor Heyerdahl be next?  

literarykids:

 Lost for Words, by Natalie Russell; Peachtree Publishers, $16.95, 32 pages, ages 4-6.

Most writers with a deadline to meet have at least on occasion been afflicted with a debilitating case of writer’s block. In Natalie Russell’s latest offering we meet Tapir, a creature armed with fresh supplies of pencil and paper but utterly unable find a suitable topic. In search of inspiration he visits Giraffe the poet, Hippo the adventure writer and Flamingo the composer.  All write in different ways, and although Tapir doesn’t realize that right away, he soon discovers just how to express himself best.

Russell’s screen prints are at once gentle and bright. Charming illustrations of jungle creatures are set against a backdrop of saturated colors, creating a sub-Saharan fantasy world of hot pink flowers and tangerine skies.  Russell’s message that creativity is unlimited and cannot be forced will motivate artists and writers of all ages to follow their own creative groove.   


Pub Date: March 1, 2014

 Lost for Words, by Natalie Russell; Peachtree Publishers, $16.95, 32 pages, ages 4-6.

Most writers with a deadline to meet have at least on occasion been afflicted with a debilitating case of writer’s block. In Natalie Russell’s latest offering we meet Tapir, a creature armed with fresh supplies of pencil and paper but utterly unable find a suitable topic. In search of inspiration he visits Giraffe the poet, Hippo the adventure writer and Flamingo the composer.  All write in different ways, and although Tapir doesn’t realize that right away, he soon discovers just how to express himself best.

Russell’s screen prints are at once gentle and bright. Charming illustrations of jungle creatures are set against a backdrop of saturated colors, creating a sub-Saharan fantasy world of hot pink flowers and tangerine skies.  Russell’s message that creativity is unlimited and cannot be forced will motivate artists and writers of all ages to follow their own creative groove.   


Pub Date: March 1, 2014

The School for Good and Evil Book 1 and The Children of The King, 5-4-2014.m4v

The School for Good and Evil Book 1 and The Children of The King, 5-4-2014.m4v

 Shackleton: Antarctic Odyssey, by Nick Bertozzi; First Second Books, $16.99, 128 pages, ages 12-18. (Publication date: June 17, 2014)

Amateur and professional explorers worldwide will mark the centennial of Ernest Shackelton’s ill-fated yet miraculous voyage to the Antarctic this year. Entire documentaries and symposiums are devoted to understanding how the entire crew survived in polar conditions after their ship became trapped and ultimately crushed in pack ice. There’s even a cruise called the Shackelton 100 that will recreate the route of the Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition. 

For adventurers staying close to home, Nick Bertozzi’s graphic novel replicates the voyage through a riveting and wholly original approach to telling this story of survival. Historians have meticulously documented the expedition, but in this account Bertozzi changes the point of view by inviting the reader onto the Endurance alongside the captain and his crew.  Each panel illustrates the minutiae of life aboard a sea vessel – from chronicling Mr. Orde-Lee riding a bicycle across the ice, to a chapter called “Last Dog” which delicately handles the issue of starvation and self-preservation. 

Bertozzi’s black and white illustrations overflow with visual detail while creating a solid and engaging story.  Ships, men and various polar creatures are at once grand and familiar. While the author is quite deft depicting each man in the story, Shackelton stands out from his crew; a tall, dark-haired commander determined to bring  all twenty-eight crewmen home after almost two years lost at sea.

Writing and illustrating stories of great explorers seems second-nature to Bertozzi, whose previous work includes Lewis and Clark, an equally inventive examination of two great explorers. Could Amelia Earhart or Thor Heyerdahl be next?